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Mutation Analysis

Home Tribute to Lee Overton Known Overton Lines Clan Lineages Mutation Analysis Frequently Asked ? Haplogroups

(This page updated July 17, 2011)

DNA Participants, Please Note: This DNA Project Website is maintained on a voluntary basis.  If you see an error or omission in any of your information on this or any other web page, please don't hesitate to contact Patrick Childress at londonwildcat@earthlink.net and request an update!  We rely on your eyes to catch our mistakes...Also, please be aware that this web page is updated only when all results from an individual's testing have been received.  There frequently is a several week delay between receipt of the first 12-marker test results and the extended results, so please be patient.

When we examine the Y-DNA results, we speak in terms of "repetitions" which are the numerical values assigned to each of the 12-, 25-, 37- or 67-marker positions.  These "repetitions" range from a low of about "8" to a high of about "38" for each marker, or alleles.  Once we've managed to group individuals together in a common "Clan" based on the similarity of marker values (repetitions) on each of the alleles, the absolute value of each marker is immaterial - we just know that Clan 1, for example, is comprised of four individuals whose marker values are identical on all but a few of the marker values.

Thus, once we have determined the constituents of a "Clan," we can effectively discard all those marker values in each Clan where all the members have identical results and then concentrate only on the markers where there are mutations from the baseline for the Clan.  (The baseline is that repetition number which is associated with the greatest number of participants for each marker.)

The purpose of the following table is to draw the reader's attention to those mutations from each Clan baseline for each participant.  By carefully examining each participant's mutations, particularly where there are matching mutations with other participants, we can begin to draw fairly accurate conclusions concerning the Overton family tree and its various branches.  Any of the 12-, 25-, 37- or 67-markers not shown in the following table indicates that all participants within that Clan had identical values for that marker.

Click here for a complete spreadsheet of all marker values for all participants (wait a moment for the data to load to the page).

What do these "Clans" mean?  Every individual in each Clan is, by definition, a cousin to every other individual in their Clan.  Perhaps the relationship is "cousin, 10 times removed," but each is a cousin to the others by virtue of having a common ancestor.  Remember, in order for an individual to be assigned to any Clan, their 25-marker DNA test results must demonstrate at least a 25% probability of having a Common Ancestor within the past 24 generations with any other individual in a Clan.  Click here to review each Clan Lineage.

(Red marker numbers below  indicate a "fast mutating" marker...average mutations occur only once every 6,000 years or so; these fast mutating markers can change more quickly.  Click on the Haplogroup designation below to go to a definition page describing that Haplogroup's origin.)

Note:  Anyone wishing to remove their name from the following chart should immediately contact the Group Administrator!

NOTE:  RESULTS SHOWN BELOW ARE EFFECTIVE AS OF JULY 17, 2011.  SEE NOTICE AT TOP OF THIS PAGE!

CLAN 1  Y-DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS ONLY
Haplogroup R1b1

8 members

The markers shown to the right are ONLY those which have at least one mutation in the entire Clan from the baseline value. 3
9
1
3
8
9
|
2
4
5
5

4
4
7

4
4
9
C
D
Y
a

OBSERVATIONS:
All of the Overton surname members of this Clan 1 cite ancestors whose American roots originated in North Carolina.  Cousins, certainly; brothers, perhaps?  The problem with this possibility is that the FTDNA relationship calculator suggests that there is only a 4% probability of a common ancestor between Alton Lee Overton and Howard B. Overton in the last 8 generations, given the number of mutations (4 single steps) that have occurred.  Between Howard, Keith and Robert there has been only one single step mutation occurring; thus, there is a 58% probability of a common ancestor in the last eight generations.  Click here for a proposed Clan 1 Lineage chart.

(top number to right is alleles location)
CLAN 1 - baseline ---

4
11
12
30
16
11
18
25
21
29
34
37
The bold marker values to the left are those most likely carried by the M.R.C.A. (baseline)
#!
23012

25  marker
Alton Lee Overton
(Deceased son Bill Overton is contact)
10 30 12 24 29 37 (David, b. 1765 in NC)
#2
36590

67  marker
Donald Ray Overton 11 30 11 25 28 37 (David, b. 1765 in NC)
#3
27980

25 marker
Keith Andrew Overton 11 30 11 25 29 37 Keith Andrew Overton and Robert Lee Overton have a perfect 25 for 25 marker match, meaning that there is an 85% probability of a common ancestor within the past 8 generations, or about 200 years.
(John, Jr., b. 1758 in NC)
#4
70278

25 marker

Robert Lee Overton

11 30 11 25 29 37 (see note above)
(Moses, b. 1763 in NC)
#5
90215

25 marker

Howard B. Overton

11 31 11 25 29 37 (Asa, b. 1771 in NC)
#6
150858

37 marker

Kevin Glynn Overton

11 30 11 25 29 37 (Aaron, b. 1773 in NC)

#7
10091

67 marker
George Johnson
(Sponsor is 1st Cousin, Angela Clyburn)
12 30 11 25 29 37 George Johnson's Y-DNA results reflect a near-perfect match with the proposed "Ancestral Signature" (see above Clan 1 baseline) at the extended, 67-marker level.  This would indicate that there is a very high probability of either a "non-aligning paternal event" such as an unannounced adoption, a surname change from "Overton" to "Johnson" or infidelity in the past.  The possibility also exists that distant ancestors for the Johnson family line and the Overton family line were closely related before the assignment of surnames (about 1,000 years ago) and that mutations have been virtually non-existent in both lines.
#8
156735

37 marker
Samuel T. Johnson
(Sponsor is Sister, Shirley J. Cayton)
11 30 11 25 29 36 Since Samuel and George Johnson are proven cousins, the above verbiage applies to both participants.

 

CLAN 2  Y-DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS ONLY
Haplogroup E1b1b1

5 members

The markers shown to the right are ONLY those which have at least one mutation in the entire Clan from the baseline value. 1
9
3
9
1
4
3
9
3
8
9
~
1
3
8
9
~
2
4
4
9
4
4
2
4
0
6
S
1
4
8
7

OBSERVATIONS:

(top number to right is alleles location)
CLAN 2 - baseline ---

3
14
4
10
9
14
10
13
12
30
21
32
36
11
46
13
63
15
The bold marker values to the left are those most likely carried by the M.R.C.A. (baseline)

#1
25920

37 marker
Ronald Andrew Overton
(Sponsor is Anna O. Jackson)
14 10 13 13 30 32 12 13 15

-

#2
43656

25 marker
Kelley Dean Overton 14 10 14 13 30 31 - - -

-

#3
31465

37 marker
Marvin Cartmell Overton III, M.D. 14 10 14 13 30 32 11 - - Marvin's aunt, Nan West Overton, has traced this family lineage back to England in the mid-17th century.
#4
25939

25 marker
Bill Overton 14 10 14 13 30 32 - - - Bill's DNA reflects an extra allele value of 17 on 464e which is not present on any other member of this Clan
#5
182303

37 marker
Colin Charles Overton 13 11 14 14 31 32 11 12 14 Colin Charles Overton's marker values differ significantly to the Clan 2 "baseline" (the baseline represents the likely marker values of the most recent common ancestor in this Clan).  However, his marker profile is close enough to the baseline that there is little doubt that Colin is part of this Clan.  Using the FTDNA Relationship Calculator, there is a greater than 50% probability that Colin and Marvin Cartmell Overton had a common ancestor within the past eight generations (about 200 years).  There is a greater than 93% probability of a common ancestor between these two participants going back 16 generations (about 400 years).


CLAN 3  Y-DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS ONLY
Haplogroup R1b1b2

10 members

The markers shown to the right are ONLY those which have at least one mutation in the entire clan from the baseline value. 3
8
5
a
4
6
4
d
C
D
Y
b

OBSERVATIONS:

(top number to right is alleles location)
CLAN 3 - baseline ---

5
11
25
17
35
37
The bold marker values to the left are those most likely carried by the M.R.C.A. (baseline)
#1
39244

37 marker; mtDNA Plus
Steve Randall Overton 11 17 37 Steve's Haplogroup is defined by FTDNA as R1b1b2a1b, thus the balance of this Clan 3 may rest assured their Haplogroup also is R1b1b2a1b.  (It's interesting to note that Steve's initial test results from FTDNA indicated a very high number of marker mutations (three out of 37) but subsequent retesting demonstrated that the first test had errors and that in reality, Steve had no mutations at all when compared to the calculated "baseline")
#2
100551

37 marker
Robert Glenn Overton 11 17 38 Robert should be looking for the next Clan 3 Participant who has the same mutation on CDY b.
#3
25364

25 marker
Harold C. Overton
(Dot Donegan is sponsor for H.C. Overton)
11 17 37 Harold C. Overton, Robert Wallace Overton and Robert Glenn Overton have a perfect 25 for 25 marker match, meaning that there is an 85% probability of a common ancestor within the past 8 generations, or about 200 years.
#4
32046

25 marker
Robert Wallace Overton
(Roger Williams, PhD., is sponsor for R.W. Overton)
11 17 37 (see note above)
#5
93531

37 marker

Walter Scott Overton

15 17 37 Scott's marker result on 385a, a fast mutating marker, is a bit misleading as it suggests that there is a four-step mutation difference between Scott and the Clan 3 baseline (11 versus 15).  However this mutating phenomenon is known as a "RecLOH" an abbreviation for "Recombinational Loss of Heterozygosity."  In this case, a marker overwrites itself and instead of mutating only once, the mutation appears multiple times.  For the purpose of genealogical analysis, this mutation is regarded as a single step mutation.  Thus, the probability of a common ancestor existing between Scott and Harold and Robert within the last 16 generations is 90%; within the last 8 generations, 50%, based on the 25-marker tests.  Since Walter and Steve Randall Overton both have 37-marker tests completed, we can state that the probability of a common ancestor for these two individuals within the last 16 generations is 97%; within the last 8 generations, 72%; and a 31% probability of a common ancestor between these two individuals within the last 4 generations.

#6
145398

37 marker

Richard Eugene Overton

11 17 37 Steve Randall Overton, Harold C. Overton, Robert Wallace Overton, Richard Eugene Overton, John Hane Overton and Peter Brian Overton all have a perfect 37 for 37 marker match, meaning that there is an 84% probability of a common ancestor within the past 4 generations, or about 100 years.
#7
157131

37 marker
John Hane Overton 11 17 37 (see note above)
#8
154309

37 marker
Peter Brian Overton
(Contact is Dayna Overton Owskey, Peter's sister)
11 17 37 (see note above)
#9
160448

37 marker
David Overton
(Contact is Maggie Overton, David's sister)
11 16 37

-

#10
185386

37 marker
Bobby Morris Overton
(sponsor and contact is daughter, C.C. Overton)
11 17 37

-



CLAN 4  Y-DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS ONLY
Haplogroup J2

3 members

The markers shown to the right are ONLY those which have at least one mutation in the entire clan from the baseline value. 4
2
6
4
6
4
b
4
6
4
c

OBSERVATIONS:

(top number to right is alleles location)
CLAN 4 - baseline ---

7
11
23
13
24
15
The bold marker values to the left are those most likely carried by the M.R.C.A. (baseline)
#1
46213

25 marker
Brian Dale Overton 10 10 13 With this many mutations of markers when compared to Brian Dale and Mark Charles, we must go back at least 16 generations before the probability of having a common ancestor between the two Clan member increases to greater than 50%.  A 37-marker test might serve us well in further aligning these Clan 4 members.
#2
49149
25 marker
Robert Leland Overton II 11 13 15 Robert Leland and Mark Charles Overton have a perfect 25 for 25 marker match, meaning that there is an 85% probability of a common ancestor within the past 8 generations, or about 200 years.
#3
156218
37 marker

Mark Charles Overton

11 13 15 (see above note)


CLAN 5  Y-DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS ONLY
Haplogroup J2

2 members

The markers shown to the right are ONLY those which have at least one mutation in the entire clan from the baseline value.

OBSERVATIONS:

#1
68291

25 marker
Charles Warren Overton Charles Warren and Edgar Anderson Overton have a perfect 25 for 25 marker match, meaning that there is an 85% probability of a common ancestor within the past 8 generations, or about 200 years.
#2
45562

25 marker
- GenoProject
Conversion
Edgar Anderson Overton (see above note)

 

CLAN 6  Y-DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS ONLY
Haplogroup R1b1b2

4 members

The markers shown to the right are ONLY those which have at least one mutation in the entire clan from the baseline value. 3
9
1
3
8
5
a
4
6
4
c
4
6
4
d

OBSERVATIONS:

(top number to right is alleles location)
CLAN 6 - baseline ---

4
11
5
12
24
17
25
18
The bold marker values to the left are those most likely carried by the M.R.C.A. (baseline)
#1
120466

25 marker

Benjamin Eugene Overton
(Wallar H. Overton is contact for Benjamin)

11 12 17 18 FTDNA statistical models suggest that there is more than a 58% probability that Benjamin and Wallace share a common ancestor within the past 8 generations.
#2
145482

67 marker

Wallace Henry Overton

12 12 17 18 (see above note)
#3
139306

25 marker

Malcolm Eugene Overton

11 11 15 19 Whether Malcolm and the other two members of this Clan 6 are related in the genealogical sense (within the past 500 years or so) remains to be discovered.  Here's what FTDNA has to say about a mismatch of 3 out of 25 markers between Malcolm and Benjamin:  "You share the same surname (or a variant) but are off by 3 'points' or 3 locations on the 25 markers tested. If enough time has passed it is possible that you and another distantly related family members' line each have had a mutation, or perhaps 2. The only way to prove that is to test additional family lines and find where the mutation took place. Only by further testing can you find the person in between each of you.."  Interestingly, the mismatches occurred on the markers identified by FTDNA as being most likely to change, or mutate, between two related individuals with the same surname.  Statistically speaking, we have to go back more than 16 generations (nearly 400 years) to have at least a 50/50 chance of finding a common ancestor.
#4
192145

37 marker
Lloyd Lyndell Overton 11 12 17 18

-

 

CLAN 7  Y-DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS ONLY
Haplogroup E1b1b1

3 members

The markers shown to the right are ONLY those which have at least one mutation in the entire clan from the baseline value. C
D
Y

a

OBSERVATIONS:

(top number to right is alleles location)
CLAN 7 - baseline ---

34
35
The bold marker values to the left are those most likely carried by the M.R.C.A. (baseline)
#1
150613

12 marker

Dan Overton
(no e-mail address given)

-

Dan and Kenneth Overton are first (or second) cousins.
#2
56003

37 marker

Kenneth Michael Overton

34 Dan and Kenneth matched 12 for 12 on the first 12 markers.
#3
175513

37 marker

Christopher Grasett Overton

35

Based on their 37-marker tests, Kenneth and Christopher have more than an 87% probability of a common ancestor within the past eight generations.  Analysis of their lineage chart reveals a common resident state of New York for their ancestors in the 18th century.  It's possible that their earliest known ancestors (Nathaniel b. 1712 and David b. abt. 1712) were brothers and if not, certainly close cousins.

 

CLAN 8  Y-DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS ONLY
Haplogroup R1b1b2

2 members

The markers shown to the right are ONLY those which have at least one mutation in the entire clan from the baseline value. 3
8
5
b

OBSERVATIONS:

(top number to right is alleles location)
CLAN 8 - baseline ---

6
15
The bold marker values to the left are those most likely carried by the M.R.C.A. (baseline)
#1
N80557

1marker
Dr. Barrie Edward Overton 14 With only a 12-marker test to review, it would be incorrect to definitively state that Barrie and Michael share a common Overton ancestor within a genealogical time basis (less than 1,000 years).  However, the FTDNA Relationship Calculator suggests that there is a greater than 50% probability that such an individual lived within the past 20 generations.
#2
182385

37  marker
Michael Scott Overton 15 See comment above.

 

CLAN 9  Y-DNA MARKER ANALYSIS OF MUTATIONS ONLY
Haplogroup I2b1

2 members

The markers shown to the right are ONLY those which have at least one mutation in the entire clan from the baseline value. D
Y
S
3
8
9
ii

OBSERVATIONS:

(top number to right is alleles location)
CLAN 9 - baseline ---

12
32
The bold marker values to the left are those most likely carried by the M.R.C.A. (baseline)
#1
190834

67  marker
Eric David Overton 31

The FTDNA Relationship Calculator suggests that there is a greater than 97% probability of a common ancestor between Eric and Thomas within the past 12 generations, as we would suspect, given their common, documented lineage.

#2
028103

67  marker
Thomas Chalmers Overton 32

-

ANY MEMBER NOT SHOWN IN ONE OF THE ABOVE CHARTS IS NOT CURRENTLY ASSIGNED TO A CLAN.

CONTACTS FOR QUESTIONS?

For additions, corrections or comments regarding this specific website, please send an e-mail to:

Patrick Childress, website author & Overton DNA Project Co-Administrator
You may also e-mail Overton Project Co-Administrators Steve Overton or Dot Donegan